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Redmond

Maragas Winery Reopens Lattavo Gallery

Read more: Maragas Winery Reopens Lattavo GalleryThe caricature art adorning the bottles of Maragas wines was created by Doug Maragas' mother, Joanne Lattavo, in the late '50s and early '60s. What you may not know is Joanne was an accomplished oil painter with a renowned art gallery throughout the ‘60s. Contemporary artists and entertainment greats such as Harry Wheeler, Mary Ann Flynn, Mel Someroski, Louis Armstrong, Buddy Hacket and several others showed their art or performed at the Gallery.


Doug has had numerous art pieces created or collected by his mother (who passed away in 2002) in storage for several years. “It’s time to share her art with the world again, and what better time to kick it off than the weekend of Thanks.”


Doug has realized a unique concept for the re-opened Lattavo Gallery. He opened the Gallery inside the barrel room of Maragas Winery on Thanksgiving. “It may be the first art gallery in a Barrel Room in the Country. We limited the barrel stacks to three high and mounted the paintings above the barrels all along the walls - out of harm's way of an accidental wine splash from a barrel. Uniquely at our barrel room, we also use low humidity to intensify the flavors in our wine which protects the painting frames from warping.”
Art that will be initially displayed in the Gallery will include several paintings by Lattavo, Flynn, Lessig and McDonald. Combined, it's a beautiful harmony - fine art and the art of wine making.


Hwy. 97 just 25 miles north of Bend. 541-546-5464, www.maragaswinery.com

Alfred Dolezal: Creating a Reality

Read more: Alfred Dolezal: Creating a Realityby LAUREN KERSHNER Cascade A&E Editorial Intern

 

Alfred Dolezal has always questioned the reason for living. He says, “I was never convinced that we are just born, make a living and die...”


Born in Vienna, Austria during World War II, Dolezal has found many of his answers within the stroke of a paint brush. Since buying his first set of oil paints at the age of 23, he has painted 272 works, adorning walls in 36 states and seven countries.


In December 2013, Dolezal and his wife, Patti, opened an art gallery in Eagle Crest Resort near Redmond. The gallery offers an abundance of thought-provoking compositions, whose symbolism and stories are readily translated by Dolezal himself. Upon entrance, he asks visitors if they’d like the “short tour” or the “long tour,” joking that the long tour takes “about two days.”


A wall to wall tapestry of color, the paintings in Dolezal’s gallery are rich with philosophical themes, stories that enthrall the mind and illusions that fool the eye.


The painting entitled In Nomini Dei – in the name of God – depicts two separate cultures praising different gods, symbolized by a black bird and a white bird. Fused into the picture is a portrait of a woman – who Dolezal identifies as his wife. Her face is easy to miss upon first glance, but unmistakable when stepping backward a few feet. Her image seems to represent a unification of the masses.


“Unity is a big word in this gallery,” Dolezal says.


Dolezal’s passion for oneness is exemplified in A Racial Opportunity – a spin on the King of Hearts that illustrates both a Caucasian and an African American king. The pictures rotates at the push of a button, making a full circle so that both kings get their “turn” being upright in the painting. Hiding behind the painting is a quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. that is visible halfway through the picture’s rotation:


“Either we learn to live together in unity as brothers, or we perish as fools apart...”


Another painting featured in Dolezal’s gallery tells a lesser known tale of the infamous Titanic. On one side of the picture is the Titanic herself. On the other, is the fictional ship named the Titan, created by author Morgan Robertson in his novel Futility. In Robertson’s book, the Titan perishes in the sea on her maiden voyage after colliding with an ice berg – an eerie parallel to the Titanic’s fate 14 years later. The ships are separated by the Titanic’s Grand Staircase, with the glass dome looming overhead. Dolezal calls it The Creation of Reality.


Over a span of 60 years, Dolezal’s relationship with art has answered a plethora of life’s questions, creating a reality comparable to a work of art.


Alfred Dolezal’s Gallery, 7525 Falcon Crest Dr Ste 100, Redmond, 434-989-3510, www.alfreddolezal.com

 

New Redmond Public Art at the Yew Avenue Roundabout

The City of Redmond recently celebrated their first roundabout art installation at the Yew Avenue and 27th Avenue roundabout. Over the past year a team of students from Redmond and Ridgeview High Schools (RHS) and the Redmond Proficiency Academy (RPA) successfully designed, built, welded and assembled the sculpture inspired by the Cascade mountain range and the natural beauty of the high desert. Under the dedicated guidance of teachers Ethan Stelzer and Lance Hill as well as local artist-in-residence Ryan Beard, the student’s vision is now a permanent part of Redmond’s landscape.


Read more: New Redmond Public Art at the Yew Avenue RoundaboutThe journey began in the Spring of 2013 when Redmond Commission for Art in Public Places (RCAPP) tasked Stelzer with coordinating the project with the expectation of having all area high schools involved to produce a community-oriented piece of art that would be installed in the Yew roundabout.  


The student design team, with help from local artist Ryan Beard, developed concepts, presented ideas and voted as a group to decide which concept to pursue. Students collaborated on the design ideas, crafted a budget proposal and created a maquette (small version of the sculpture). The students presented the proposal, and it was approved first by RCAPP and then the City Council. As RPA students continued on the design, welding students from RHS began work on the fabrication and students at RPA continued with the design.


“It’s exciting to complete a project of this magnitude. The collaboration between students and high schools has been incredibly rewarding. Each student brought their own skills and abilities to the project, and this is a great example of the sum being greater than the individual parts.  I don’t think a single artist working alone could have created a sculpture like this,” said Stelzer.


“Every year since 2010 the Redmond Commission for Art in Public Places has partnered with the Redmond School District on a public art project in order to highlight and celebrate the talented youth in our community, and to engage youth in what we do. This is the largest one yet and is demonstrative of the wonderful opportunities that come out of a dynamic partnership between the local government and local schools,” said Heather Richards, community development director for the City of Redmond. 


“The students were responsible for design, budget management, fabrication and installation of this sculpture,” Richards continued. “It was a huge undertaking and they exceeded all expectations, gifting our community with a tremendous legacy public art project that will be enjoyed by all. My hope is that our partnership with Redmond’s youth will continue to evolve and grow, so that we can celebrate many similar successes in the future. A big thank you to everyone involved.” 


Heather Richards, Community Development Director at 541-923-7756

Juniper Brewing Company Presents Oregon in Focus

Juniper Brewing Company of Redmond presents Oregon in Focus, a two person exhibition of photography by Gary Wing and Linda Ziegenhagen through November 7 in the brewery’s taproom.


Gary Wing grew up in western Montana, and it was there in the Rocky Mountains he developed a love of the outdoors, either hiking or riding his horse in the mountains behind his house. Moving to Redmond in 1959 and graduating from Redmond Union High School in 1964, he developed a passion for the desert country and the Cascade Range.


After graduating from OSU, Wing had a career as a biologist and also worked as a ranch manager. Retiring in 2011, he returned to his passion for photography, which he had begun in the 70’s, but could never find time for. He combines his photography work with his wood working skills and produces all his own wood frames.


Linda Ziegenhagen retired in 1999 after a 30 year teaching career with the Redmond School District, and suddenly had time to pursue her interest in creating pictures.


With the purchase of a digital camera, she now had a new affordable medium with which to share her views of the world and allowed her to become more involved with photography. For Ziegenhagen, learning is on-going and she was energized by COCC classes and by memberships in the CCC and SAPC photography groups.


One of the newest breweries in Redmond, Juniper Brewing Company was inspired by a passion for brewing great craft beer. Co-owners Curt Endicott and Scott Lesmeister have pledged to consistently offer the “highest quality ales to the growing populous of enlightened consumers.”  The Juniper tree silhouetted on their logo is an ancient beast that stands out front of their initial brewing location and long ago was given the name Old Roy. Their IPA, with the same name, is an honorary tribute to this tree for standing the test of time.


Located at 1950 SW Badger Ave., Suite 103, Redmond, Juniper Brewing Company presently offers six beers on tap which include Old Roy IPA, Jolly Black, The Milkman Wit, Crooked Cream and some rotating taps of their other fine ales. Brews are presently available in pints and growlers.


Gary Wing at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , Linda Ziegenhagen at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Glen Douglas Warren Opens Shop in Redmond

Read more: Glen Douglas Warren Opens Shop in RedmondTerry Underhill and Bub Warren have reopened their shop in Redmond, Glen Douglas Warren, at the old potato shed building on 337 Railroad Way. They spent the past two years on Highway 97 operating Cowboy Trading Post. Outgrowing that building, they moved to their new building and will continue to offer museum quality Pendleton Bags and purses as well as western style furniture pieces.


“Recently I finished a bed headboard bench, fully leather carved, with salt and pepper cowhide back, sterling silver from John Hyde at Yamsi, Oregon and rawhided by Bill Black of Plush, Oregon,” explained Warren. The bench incorporated four craftsman, including Brent Gourley who made the wooden bench.


“We are an upscale store, selling custom saddles and leatherwork, furniture, art, bags, gun leathers, jewelry, native American beading and collectible salesman sample saddles for that ultimate collector of our western traditions and past.”


The location, if off the beaten path, is a short distance from downtown Redmond. “Central Oregon has become a destination for many years now and we are like committed to offer opportunity for tourist to take home items hand made in Central Oregon,” offers Warren.


Open six days a week, 8am-5pm, 541-350-2876, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.